mobile | Klaava Travel Guide nonfiction ebooks

Tag Archives: mobile

Intel has created a working product concept that many ebook readers and writers want

2018-06-11

Intel is hoping more mobile device manufacturers would use its processors and other components on their products, and has created an exciting concept product to showcase the power of its processors in mobile devices. Intel Tiger Rapids is a tablet/e-reader device, or a unique laptop, that is about the size of a sturdy notebook. It can be used for reading, writing, and for all other things that tablets and ereaders are used.
Intel Tiger Rapids tablet/ereaderIntel Tiger Rapids tablet/ereader concept.

The Intel Tiger Rapids device consists of two elements: a tablet and an E Ink device that are hinged so that the device can be closed like a notebook, and opened like a laptop. The two elements can be turned so that they are back-to-back against each other.

The E Ink screen recognizes handwriting with a stylus. A virtual keyboard cab be projected on the E Ink screen, allowing typing.

The tablet side of the Tiger Rapids device has 7.9-inch LCD display. The E Ink display is 7.8 inches in size. A Kaby Lake Core processor is the engine in the device and Wi-Fi connects it to the world. A USB-C port can be used to recharge the device.

A potential problem for a device that comes with two screens is its retail price. In this case, both the LCD and E ink screens are touch sensitive, adding cost. It may be difficult to squeeze the retail priced under 500 dollars/euros, but I certainly hope a company manages to do it.

Also battery life could be a problem, but Intel told Cnet that the Tiger Rapids prototype runs for 13-15 hours which is very good. Almost two full work days before a recharge is required.

The Intel prototype is very compact in size and easy to carry along in a bag, or even in a pocket of a winter jacket. For typing on a virtual keyboard (in this case, on the E ink screen), a 10-inch screen – or even larger – would be better. 10 inches is probably the sweet spot considering product price, usability for work (and leisure) and portability.

Here is a video by Engadget where a reporter makes a brief hands-on test to the Intel Tiger Rapids.

Take the book about movie stunts along on your mobile phone wherever you shoot action scenes

2018-01-22

The book Stunts, Scenes and Safety – Introduction to Movie Stunts was originally published for the Apple iPad only. The reason was that it was the only ebook system that allowed video clips inside a book at the time. Well, times have changed since the original edition was published, and so has the book, which is now available for smartphones, tablets and computers.

Stunts, Scenes and Safety, book content pagesBook pages on a smartphone.
The concept for the book had been brewing in H-P Virkki’s head, who is an experienced professional stuntman, for a long time. When the iPad started the tablet revolution and Apple introduced the iBooks Author multimedia ebook design software, he knew his vision could be turned into reality. And so we did.

The one thing with Apple is that no matter how great its products and tools are, everything tends to work on Apple devices alone. Since many movie fans and aspiring stuntmen kept asking for the book to be made available for smartphones, Android tablets and PCs, we created a mobile edition of the book that works on practically all mobile devices.

In addition to the iBooks edition, Stunts, Scenes and Safety is also available as an EPUB and Kindle book. It means that exactly the same content can be viewed on a smartphone, tablet or computer, only the layout is different.
Stunts, Sccenes and Safety, book layout on a tabletBook layout on a tablet.
The book is available in all major online bookstores that sell ebooks, for instance:

Amazon.com
Apple iBooks (the iBooks edition comes with embedded video clips – be patient with the download)
Barnes & Noble
Google Play Books
Kobo

If you get your book from the Amazon Kindle Store, download the Kindle reading application from the app store. If you download your book from the Apple store, make sure you have iBooks app on your mobile device. Other bookstores let you read ebooks in a variety of apps. For instance, FBReader, Aldiko, Kobo and Google Books are popular reading apps.

The author of the book, stuntman and stunt coordinator H-P Virkki, has performed in many movies and he has trained actors, athletes and stuntmen at dedicated courses, universities and theaters.

More about the book here.

Below a couple of samples from the iPad edition of the book.
stunts, scenes and safety book on ipad
stunts, scenes and safety - ipad screen shot

Publishing year 2017 in review: trends, analysis, developments

2017-12-16

It is not business as usual in the world of digital media. Ebooks and other digital media content products are still taking their first steps in the global and local markets. Many things in book business and digital technology changed in 2017 and will change in the coming years. It is only 10 years since the launch of Amazon Kindle, but 500 years from Gutenberg’s invention.

Book as a concept has proven it has its place – independent of the format. Year 2017 didn’t challenge that, although new ways of enjoying a book became more popular. The following key development points in publishing are reviewed primarily from the digital side of book publishing.

a speaker and audience at Frankfurt book fair

Ebook markets continue to grow

One publishing industry expert claims that the ebook market is shrinking, whereas another expert says it is growing. Both experts can be right when they only look at their own data sources. Big US publishers have lost ebook market share to small publishers and self-publishers. No one knows the actual sales numbers of indie publishers and self-publishers, but one can always estimate, and it looks like a large, growing market that is eating market share from big publishers.

Data collected from other than English-language markets indicate a healthy and innovative digital market development, for instance, in Continental Europe, Spanish-language markets and China. Even France is accepting ebooks and ereaders.

Audiobook is the fastest growing format

Book lovers in English-speaking markets are familiar with Audible audiobooks, but in many others parts of the world, Swedish startup Storytel is the reason for rapid growth of audiobooks. Storytel has been so successful that it has acquired traditional books publishers in order to secure rights for as many books as possible.

A key development that will have an effect on audiobook market is computer applications that can read aloud texts. They may be individual applications running on a tablet or smartphone, or voice assistants, like Alexa or Siri. The technology is pretty good already, and as it develops, it may lower product prices.

Attempts to automate writing may be more common than we are aware of

For years, we have heard of projects that have tried to automate the reporting of sports results and simple news reports. Meanwhile, the development of artificial intelligence (AI) software has reached a level where it can be applied to simple writing tasks. The Washington Post is already using a robot writer, and clever programmers have created an algorithm that can imitate Harry Potter fiction.

Should a writer be worried? No. Someone must produce the source material for writing robots and review their output, among other things.

Ereaders are still here and still wanted by avid readers

I am the first one to admit that I expected tablets and large screen smartphones (phablets) to replace ereaders as ebook reading devices, but it hasn’t happened. In some markets, like the US and the UK, people who want an ereader already have one or two, and the market is saturated. In many other large markets, such as Germany, France, Spain and China, the market for ereaders is growing because the market for ebooks is still growing.

A key development during 2017 was the emergence of large screen ereaders. Devices from 7 to 13 inches are now available. Some of these have a stylus for making it easy to jot down notes on documents and books. A development path from one purpose device (reading ebooks) to a device that is designed for working with documents maybe going on.

Reading has moved to mobile devices

An ereader and a tablet is a mobile device, but the big hype of recent years has been reading on smartphone screens. Wattpad, a reading and writing community of young generations, says about 90% of its users read on mobile devices.

Digital reading is most popular from 5-inch smartphone screens to 10 tablet screens. It means that fixed layout ebooks still face challenges that reflowing ebooks can manage.

EPUB3 didn’t take off (and probably won’t next year, either)

Two ebook formats dominate the digital book markets: Amazon’s proprietary Kindle format and the industry standard EPUB. The advanced, multimedia-enabled EPUB3 ebook format was announced years ago, but is hasn’t made a commercial breakthrough. In February 2017, the organization behind EPUB, IDPF (International Digital Publishing Forum), was merged into the W3C (the organization that sets the standards for the World Wide Web). New working groups, committees and strategies have been formed, and the result is that a high level agreement for the next standard EPUB4 is in the works. EPUB4 is defined as a subset of Portal Web Publication that merges HTML and EPUB.

The euphoria of self-publishing is settling down

In large English-language markets, a small number of self-publishers have made it big. Their books have been produced into successful Hollywood movies and publishers are competing for their next manuscripts. The laws of economics haven’t changed, however, as indie authors are discovering that it is just as difficult to write a bestseller as it was before. Interest in self-publishing may be settling down in the US, but in many other large markets, such as Spanish-speaking countries, Continental Europe or in China, self-publishing is only beginning to take off.

Newspapers and magazines that have reinvented themselves are making it

Attempts to turn a newspaper or magazine web site visitors into subscribers who pay for the digital content on a web site have largely failed. Only a few strongest brands have become successful when they have started to charge readers for digital content. Newspapers and magazines, like The New York Times and The Economist deliver so much value to readers that visitors are willing to pay for news stories, and especially, long reports, analysis and background stories of major events. Some other publications have discovered their own strategies for thriving in the digital era while maintaining their valuable printed heritage.

The trends in remote work in 2017

2017-08-04

Most writers are, in practice, remote workers or location independent professionals because many work from home or from a peaceful location somewhere that is not home. Writers may also travel, or even call themselves digital nomads, if they spend some time on the road and stop somewhere to continue a writing project that is being processed at the back of the mind all time, anyhow.

Workfrom is a source of information for finding spaces to work, stay or perhaps getting a job that lets you work remotely. Workfrom conducted a survey with more than 1000 mobile professionals in order to understand what the trends and facts are among remote workers in 2017.

Here are some highlights from the survey:

7 out of 10 respondents said that the tools, such as laptop bags and standing desks are a top priority to ensure productivity in their work. Video conferencing tools such as Skype and WebEx were second, with project management apps like Asana and Trello third.

About half of the remote workers work on their own, without a support of a team. That’s a plenty of freelancers out there.

The majority of respondents (57%) who work on remote teams have colleagues in multiple time zones and countries. Remote employees, entrepreneurs and consultants/contractors were likely to be part of a global team.

Most remote workers indicated that they don’t have to work at an office at all, but 42% are working five or more days per week from their home offices.

Remote workers are interested in traveling. However, most prefer to see the world through coworking or coliving programs like Nomad House, Unsettled or We Roam—a short-term, flexible arrangement where they can meet like-minded professionals. These programs scored higher than volunteer/pro-bono opportunities, overseas retreats, ecotourism, and longer, structured travel cohort programs like Remote Year.

The infographics by Workfrom:

Trends in remote work 2017, infographic by Workfrom.co

The best apps for reading ebooks on smartphone and tablet

2016-06-26

Reading books on smartphones has increased along with the rising popularity of mobile devices that have bright, large, and sharp displays. Reading ebooks on a phone or tablet is convenient only if it is easy to download and read long texts on the device. And that is a job for an app. Which app?
reading ebook in kindle app on LG G3 smartphone
First, we will list most popular reading apps for Android (for instance, Huawei, LG, Samsung, Sony tablets and smartphones ) and Apple (iOS apps that run on iPad and iPhone) devices. Second, we will give a few tips how to choose the app that’s best for you.

All the applications can be downloaded fro Apple App Store and Google Play.

The following reading applications can open EPUB ebooks, and some can open HTML, TXT, PDF books and documents as well.

24 Symbols
Aldiko Book Reader
Bluefire Reader
Bookmate
FBReader
Google Play Books
Kobo Books
KyBook (Apple only)
Marvin (Apple only)
Moon+ Reader (Android only)
NeoSoar
Nook
Scribd
Universal Book Reader (Android only)

If you download your ebooks from the Amazon Kindle Store, you must have Amazon Kindle ereader app on your mobile device. Kindle app is available for PCs as well.

Kindle

If you purchase your books from the Apple iBooks Store, you have one choice only: Apple’s own ereading app that runs on Mac as well (in addition to the iPad and iPhone).

iBooks

Listening to books instead of reading is convenient on mobile devices as long as you remember to keep a headset with you. You need an app for that as well. Two audiobook services are popular:

Audible
Storytel

reading ebook in fbreader app on LG G3

Which ereading app is the best for you?

If you already are buying, or you are going to buy, your ebooks from Amazon Kindle Store, you must install the Kindle app. The same applies to Apple iBooks Store: if it is your bookstore, you must use the iBooks app.

If you are subscribing to a service that lets you read ebooks or listen to audiobooks for a monthly fee, you must use the application provided by the service. This applies to 24 Symbols, Audible, Bookmate, Scribd and Storytel.

Many book lovers purchase their ebooks where they happen to discover them or where they get the best deal. In addition to a must-have app, you should have an ereader application that can open EPUB and PDF books. FBReader may not pretty, but it can open many document formats. Google Play Books and Bluefire Reader are both fine EPUB and PDF reading apps.

The best European cities for digital nomads

2016-05-06

People who are unfamiliar with realities of the lifestyle of modern workers who live a mobile life, may think that these digital nomads roam the world staying where they like to stay, doing what they like to do. In reality, the modern nomads tend to carefully plan ahead where they stay for the next work period and where they get work to support their roaming life.
berlin, branderburger gateBerlin, Germany.

Which place is the best to live and work naturally depends on personal preferences. Someone appreciates safety, another wants to have the great outdoors nearby, someone wants to be near surfing opportunities, and low living costs is a must for someone else. Choosing a right place to stay and work for a few weeks or for a months is not easy, but there are many people out there who already have experienced it. Why not ask their opinion?

These cities digital nomads have ranked the best to live and work in Europe in May 2016 (by Nomad List, a dynamic ranking that changes according to votes cast by members):

1. Berlin, Germany
2. Lille, France
3. Gothenburg, Sweden. Download a travel guide to Gothenburg and Sweden’s West Coast here.
4. Bristol, UK
5. Nice, France. Here is a travel guide to Nice and the French Riviera.
6. Munich, Germany
7. Leiden, Netherlands
8. Leicester, UK
9. Leeds, UK
10. Aveiro, Portugal

gothenburg, sweden

Gothenburg, Sweden.

The ranking is based on quality of life, fun stuff to do, cost of living, safety and air quality. It was published at Nomad List that doesn’t specify how many votes have been cast for the cities, so we are not sure how representative the ranking is, but it surely gives pointers to anyone planning for the next destination.

In many other quality of living rankings and the best European cities to live in reports, places like Copenhagen (Denmark), Lisbon (Portugal), Zurich (Switzerland), Barcelona (Spain), Dublin (Ireland), and Bordeaux (France) have been ranked high. Many of these rankings have been produced by sitting behind a desk in an office somewhere in London or New York and applying statistics data to calculate the results. The ranking by Nomad List is produced by people who live the mobile life, so it is not surprising that the results are different.

A remarkable thing in this top 10 list is that there are small and medium-size cities in the list. For instance, Aveiro and Lille are rather small cities compared to truly big cities like Barcelona or Berlin that often rank high.

If you are looking for a place to stay in your next destination, here are tips and services that can help you.

Nice, France.

Nice, France.


Subscribe to our newsletter on ebooks, writing and photography:

The future of travel is defined by mobile technologies, new business models, millennials and Southeast Asia

2015-08-02

Five years ago, it was 2010. Uber had just started, and its programmers were still developing the software application that redefined the business of taxis. Airbnb had been in operation for a year, but no one had heard of it yet. Very few people – if anyone – could foresee how fast new businesses would transform industries. Now, New York based travel intelligence company Skift is looking five years ahead, and is manifesting the key changes in travel by 2020.
Woman looking through binoculars on boat
In 2020, Skift expects that everything we need in travel is available online, whenever and wherever we want, and conveniently to our mobile devices (“The unbundling of everything. The on-demandification of everything. The mobility of everything.”). Silent travelers (doesn’t mean silent in traditional sense, but someone who silently arranges her trips online) define the travel services we use, and the hotbed of travel business innovation will be Southeast Asia.

The Skift Manifesto: The Future of Travel in 2020 makes bold statements about the state of affairs in five years. Here are select highlights from the manifesto.

The travel industry in 2020:
– The rise of silent traveler, a new kind of traveler who is adept at all available online and mobile tools and uses them to jump across all industry-defined silos.
– The Southeast Asian nations are where the future of travel will be tested.
– Travel business will be defined by those who build around trendlines, not headlines.
– The people creating the future of travel in 2015 and beyond are strategists, technologists and marketers.
– Business is fanatically focused on the changing consumer behavior across all sectors, not just travel.
– For the first time since the European Renaissance, watch out for the rise of Southeast Asia that is very mobile & very social.
– People are going ‘silent’ and self-reliant because they don’t want to be sold to anymore.
– New marketplace models, which have taken the best of online, mobile and social to create travel products that people can use with previously unheard of ease.

Skift’s five-year predictions are actually pretty safe, because they are based on trends that are already happening. It is, however, quite possible that a company like Google, Apple or Facebook will invent a product that transforms travel even more than Airbnb or Uber have done.

Here is a couple of scenarios from Klaava Media headquarters. Would you hire a personal chauffeur and personal assistant for your trip across Europe for the price of a rental car? The assistants can answer any question you throw at them and get you safely anywhere you want to go. Driverless cars and robots are already near their commercial breakthrough. Would you like to travel for free? Facebook, Snapchat, Whatsapp, YouTube, Spotify are all free services that take our personal information and sell it to advertisers. Perhaps someone invents a similar model for travel as well.

The whole Skift manifesto here.

Smiling women on boat

How Energy-Hungry Our New Mobile Devices Really Are?

2015-01-09

Millions of shiny new tablets, smartphones and PCs have been taken into use in late December and early January. Someone who reads ebooks on an ereader, listens to digital music on a smartphone and watches movies on a tablet may have multiple mobile devices that have to be charged every now and then. How much valuable energy do these electrical devices consume?

Forbes has put together information about energy consumption of common mobile devices, and the results are actually pretty green. Portable electronics are truly efficient with electricity. Let’s look at a few examples.
Apple iPad, ebook, eyeglasses, books,

Tablet: Apple iPad

In typical use, an iPad is fully charged once in every 48 hours. The annual energy consumption is 12 kWh, which makes about $1.50 per year (in US electricity prices).

Smartphone: iPhone

If you have to daily charge your iPhone from empty to fully-charged, the annual electricity consumption of the smartphone is 2 kWh. It means 25 cents per year.

Laptop

An average laptop in average use consumes about 72 kWh worth of electricity per year. The annual cost of energy required by a laptop is $8.

For comparison: a light bulb

A traditional 60W light bulb is a wonderful source of heat during cold winter days, but the price is high: 220 kWh per year (10 hours a day). The cost for lighting up, for instance, a reading nook is $26 per year. A LED light bulb that provides similar amount of light consumes far less energy: $4.40 per year.

Especially when traveling it may feel that the battery dies just when you were about to capture the best photo of the whole trip or when you are about to reply to an urgent email message waiting in your tablet’s inbox. At these energy consumption levels, it should be fine to ask a shop owner, café proprietor or taxi driver to lend some energy to a mobile device.

Apple iPhone, video

Mobile Phone Success Story

2010-09-23

In the 1990s, Nokia outrivaled the traditional telecommunications companies Motorola and Ericsson by introducing innovative mobile phone products that allowed personalization and gaming, and by exploiting new technologies which created businesses that didn’t exist before, such as ringtones.

Once the dot-com bubble had burst and 3G licence bidding had driven the industry into a downturn, Nokia faced new competition. Microsoft challenged Nokia in software, and Samsung and LG in hardware. Yet, Nokia was thriving as the competition heated up. It wasn’t enough, because the biggest disruption in mobile communications was yet to come – the Internet.
Behind the Scree, the Nokia story
Was it the Apple iPhone, Google Android or mismanagement of the corporation that brought Nokia to its knees? Behind the Screen tells the Nokia story from a near-bankrupt enterprise to a world leader business, and provides background information on changes in managament.