Tag Archives: device

Intel has created a working product concept that many ebook readers and writers want

2018-06-11

Intel is hoping more mobile device manufacturers would use its processors and other components on their products, and has created an exciting concept product to showcase the power of its processors in mobile devices. Intel Tiger Rapids is a tablet/e-reader device, or a unique laptop, that is about the size of a sturdy notebook. It can be used for reading, writing, and for all other things that tablets and ereaders are used.
Intel Tiger Rapids tablet/ereaderIntel Tiger Rapids tablet/ereader concept.

The Intel Tiger Rapids device consists of two elements: a tablet and an E Ink device that are hinged so that the device can be closed like a notebook, and opened like a laptop. The two elements can be turned so that they are back-to-back against each other.

The E Ink screen recognizes handwriting with a stylus. A virtual keyboard cab be projected on the E Ink screen, allowing typing.

The tablet side of the Tiger Rapids device has 7.9-inch LCD display. The E Ink display is 7.8 inches in size. A Kaby Lake Core processor is the engine in the device and Wi-Fi connects it to the world. A USB-C port can be used to recharge the device.

A potential problem for a device that comes with two screens is its retail price. In this case, both the LCD and E ink screens are touch sensitive, adding cost. It may be difficult to squeeze the retail priced under 500 dollars/euros, but I certainly hope a company manages to do it.

Also battery life could be a problem, but Intel told Cnet that the Tiger Rapids prototype runs for 13-15 hours which is very good. Almost two full work days before a recharge is required.

The Intel prototype is very compact in size and easy to carry along in a bag, or even in a pocket of a winter jacket. For typing on a virtual keyboard (in this case, on the E ink screen), a 10-inch screen – or even larger – would be better. 10 inches is probably the sweet spot considering product price, usability for work (and leisure) and portability.

Here is a video by Engadget where a reporter makes a brief hands-on test to the Intel Tiger Rapids.

How Energy-Hungry Our New Mobile Devices Really Are?

2015-01-09

Millions of shiny new tablets, smartphones and PCs have been taken into use in late December and early January. Someone who reads ebooks on an ereader, listens to digital music on a smartphone and watches movies on a tablet may have multiple mobile devices that have to be charged every now and then. How much valuable energy do these electrical devices consume?

Forbes has put together information about energy consumption of common mobile devices, and the results are actually pretty green. Portable electronics are truly efficient with electricity. Let’s look at a few examples.
Apple iPad, ebook, eyeglasses, books,

Tablet: Apple iPad

In typical use, an iPad is fully charged once in every 48 hours. The annual energy consumption is 12 kWh, which makes about $1.50 per year (in US electricity prices).

Smartphone: iPhone

If you have to daily charge your iPhone from empty to fully-charged, the annual electricity consumption of the smartphone is 2 kWh. It means 25 cents per year.

Laptop

An average laptop in average use consumes about 72 kWh worth of electricity per year. The annual cost of energy required by a laptop is $8.

For comparison: a light bulb

A traditional 60W light bulb is a wonderful source of heat during cold winter days, but the price is high: 220 kWh per year (10 hours a day). The cost for lighting up, for instance, a reading nook is $26 per year. A LED light bulb that provides similar amount of light consumes far less energy: $4.40 per year.

Especially when traveling it may feel that the battery dies just when you were about to capture the best photo of the whole trip or when you are about to reply to an urgent email message waiting in your tablet’s inbox. At these energy consumption levels, it should be fine to ask a shop owner, café proprietor or taxi driver to lend some energy to a mobile device.

Apple iPhone, video