Tag Archives: paper

For writers who like to jot down notes with pen and paper: Smart Moleskine paper notebook connects with PCs

2017-11-29

Even today, when practically every writer is carrying a powerful computer in their pocket, many like to write notes, ideas and short texts on paper. A common tip from seasoned authors to novices is to always carry a (paper) notebook and a pen along. Now, Moleskine has introduced a product that lets writers use pen and paper, but conveniently connects paper to the power of computers.
MOleskine Smart Writing Set with tablet
The concept behind Moleskine’s writing system that connects paper with computers is to let writers freely write, scribble, and draw their notes on paper, and automatically transfer all those notes to a smartphone, tablet or PC. If the writer is near his or her computer, the transfer of notes happens at the same time as the pen touches the paper. If the writer is separated from her computing device, the notes are stored in the Moleskine pen and automatically transferred to the computing device once reunited.

The Moleskine Smart Writing Set product consists of three elements:

1. A paper notebook. It looks and can be used like an ordinary Moleskine notebook but it has some special features for use with the Smart Writing system.
2. A pen with a standard replaceable ink fill. It can be used as an ordinary pen for writing on paper, but it can also wirelessly connect to a smartphone, tablet, or computer via Bluetooth.
3. An application for a smartphone, tablet or PC that connects and interacts with the pen.

The Moleskine ink pen connects via Bluetooth
All the elements are included in the Moleskine Smart Writing Set that costs $199. The product has been available since 2016 for smartphones and tablets, and in 2017, it has also become available for Windows 10 devices. The Moleskine Notes app must be downloaded from the Apple App Store, Google Play or Microsoft Store to the device that connects with the pen.

There are many features in the Moleskine Smart Writing product that let writers enhance their notes, such as recording voice memos, applying colors to notes, but for a writer who jots down more than a couple of lines of text, the key feature is transcribing. The application on a PC can turn handwriting into digital words that can be further processed in a writing application.

Moleskine’s tutorial video below shows how the system works with a tablet, but the functionality is the same on a PC or a smartphone.

There are other similar products, like Wacom or Livescribe in the market that are priced lower than the Moleskine Smart Writing Set, but the products also have many differences in features and functionality.

For writers who prefer handwriting, another option is the use a tablet, such as the Apple iPad, Samsung Tab, or Microsoft Surface to write directly on the screen with a stylus. It is not the same as paper, but the technology has developed quite close mimicking the paper and pen experience.
Moleskine smart writing set connects to Windows 10 PC
The Moleskine Smart Writing Set product contains:
– Paper Tablet (notebook) dotted with special paper designed to work with Pen+ in dotted layout. (Once the pages have been used, you must purchase a new one with the special paper for it to work with the pen).
– Pen+ smart pen.
– 1 pen tip ink refill.
– USB cable for recharging the pen.

Via The Verge.

How to restore a book damaged by water to its former glory

2017-10-28

For paper books, water is a dangerous element. If a book gets wet, nothing will restore it to the same condition as it was before the damage was done, but it is possible to get quite close. Conservation experts at the Syracuse Library have produced a video that shows how a book can be saved.

saving a wet book by Syracuse Library
The tools required for saving a book should be easily accessible at every home (apart from the book press), except for the fan that is not a common household item in countries located in cool regions. What to do if there is simply no fan in the house?

Here is the book rescue video by Syracuse University Library’s Department of Preservation and Conservation.

The next thing related to books that I am going to buy is a waterproof ereader with a case that can take a few bumps and knocks.

Fonts develop as reading shifts from paper to screen

2015-12-03

Many book readers, or readers of any kind of text, don’t give a second thought to the fonts that represent the visual image for each letter. Times Roman may have been the most popular font on printed matter, but is rarely seen on a computer, tablet or smartphone screen. There is a reason for it: the smaller the font size is, the simpler its design has to be to make it readable. The font can’t be so simple that letters look the same.
fonts on mobile phone, digiday
Typeface designer Tobias Frere-Jones recently released a new font titled Mallory specifically designed for small screens. In an interview to Digiday, he explained that the key factor that makes a font easily readable on a screen is to space the letters out, enlarge the interior of each lowercase, and simplify details.

Typographers have been aware of the solution for hundreds of years, so the technique itself is nothing new. What is new is that human kind is moving from reading texts on paper to reading text on screen. The font size is easy to change on the screen, allowing readers themselves to affect how the content looks like. Many ebook reading applications have a feature that let you even change the font of a book on the fly.

Here is a video where Frere-Jones talks about his font design:

Little Free Library Recycles Books in Delightful Manner

2015-02-06

Secondhand paper books have very little value anymore. Shops that used to buy and sell second hand books tend to trade rarities and collectors’ items, not bestsellers or general fiction and nonfiction. Fortunately, there is a way to do something with your old books: Little Free Library. Anyone can use a Little Free Library if there happens to be one in the neighborhood, or establish one if none exists.
little free library, Britain phone booth
Photo by Christine Modey.

Little Free Library is a concept created by people who like to promote reading. So far, the concept has spread more than 70 countries across the world. Over 20 000 libraries Little Free Libraries have been established.

The great thing with the initiative is how book lovers’ creativity comes alive when they think about the set up of their own libraries.

If you want to start you own library, Little Free Library has 5 easy steps to get started on the program home page.

Mental Floss has collected a photo gallery of Little Free Libraries here.

little free library newspaperbox
Photo by Josh Larios.