Tag Archives: writing

Ebook news digest: the unbreakable rule in writing, YouTube stars as authors, learning about privacy

2016-09-29

Ebook news digest September 29, 2016

woman leaning on pile of books
The One Unbreakable Rule in Business Writing (Harvard Business Review)

You’ll have to read the article to find the answer, because the reason we wanted to feature this story is that it presents three valuable questions that every nonfiction author must be able to answer. If you are planning to write a nonfiction book, can you answer these simple questions: Why are you writing this? What audience do you want to reach? Why will they care? If you can, and you are planning a book on travel, culture, history, technology or business, we publish books in these genres.

Top Tips From 5 Digital Nomads (Fox News)

Realistic tips from nomads who seem to have experience and knowledge of what they are talking about. Nomad life is for people who know what they are doing and have the willpower and skills to do it.

The age of self: the strange story of how YouTubers saved publishing (New Statesman)

The generation that grew up watching YouTube regards it perfectly normal and even exciting to to follow someone else play videogames on YouTube. That’s only one popular video genre, others are, for instance makeup tips, pranks or fashion talk. Some book publishers have leveraged the brand power of the most popular YouTube stars and produced books that, at least, have names of YouTubers under the titles. Some publishing experts believe YouTube will save books, but we must wonder: if the brand value of YouTube stars is so great, why haven’t Hollywood or music industry endorsed them?

We Asked Our Favorite Travel Photographers How To Take Better Pictures On The Road (Uproxx)

This article gives plenty of valuable tips for travel photographers and writers who take photos for their own books. First, you should master the mechanics and basic techniques for framing images, since most of these tips are inspirational and travel- or people-related.

Why I am publishing all my private emails, messages and phone calls to the internet in real time (The Telegraph)

A journalist worried about the disappearance of privay is conducting a fascinating experiment. First, he gave away his password to all online services to anyone who wanted them (there is still someone using his original Twitter account). Then, he tried to stay anonymous by using encryption technologies, pre-paid phones and avoiding revealing his location. Both methods had serious shortcomings to his personal and professional life, so he tried yet another approach: he publishes everything he does to the Internet.

Ebook news digest: improve your writing, become a Kindle master, avoid these travel photo mistakes

2016-08-01

Ebook news digest August 1, 2016

tablet, old man reading by Kat Northern Lights Man

Man reading on a tablet at a restaurant by Kat Northern Lights Man


The importance of dissatisfaction to writing (The Irish Times)

Every writer has his or her own motivation for writing. It is lonely work that tends to continue in the author’s head even after the day’s work has been completed. It is also one of the most independent professions on earth: usually the writer can decide what he does and when. Every professional writer constantly tries to improve his output. Author Michael Grothaus argues that “dissatisfaction is a writer’s most vital resource”.

7 Travel Photography Mistakes to Avoid (Digital Photography School)

All travelers, digital nomads and tourists who haven’t given a second thought to image composition but who want to develop their photography skills in order to publish a blog or an Instagram image feed should ensure that they are aware of the seven sins Kav Dafdar so carefully explains in his article.

10 Tricks To Make Yourself A Kindle Master (Gizmodo)

Sure, we have been using a Kindle ereader (actually, a number of different models) for years, but didn’t know many of the tricks David Nield shows in his article. Our favorite tips? 8 (how take a screen shot of Kindle display) and 9 (sending documents to Kindle).

What I Learned By Writing 500 LinkedIn Articles (Forbes)

A writer who discovered a perfect way of making use of his skills. He used his creative writing skills to get more business on professional networking service LinkedIn. Smart, and reminds us how many ways there are for writers to benefit from their skill.

Which Font Should I Use On My Kindle? (Fast Co. Design)

For some people – especially for graphic designers – fonts can be a passion. For an average reader or writer, fonts are a thing that they don’t take notice at all until something goes wrong. It actually is worth spending a little time on exploring the font selection on your ereader or tablet. As experts in this article argue, the best font is the one you like the best, but quite often it happens to be Georgia or Palatino.

Do you want your non-fiction book published?

Ebook news digest: exciting new travel cameras, mobile security, history of writing tools

2016-07-08

Ebook News Digest July 8th, 2016

freewrite typewriter, word processor, woman
This Pocketable Camera Gear Will Change the Way You Take Travel Photos (The Wall Street Journal)

Wall Street Journal’s traveling reporter tests three new small cameras that are designed to change the way you photograph. The reviewed cameras are the LG 360 CAM (a 360 degree camera that can shoot photos and video), Narrative Clip 2 (a tiny camera that can document everything you see), and Moment (a set of lenses for the iPhone).

Executive’s guide to mobile security (free ebook) (Zdnet)

Scary news of a new virus that can invade Android-powered phones and tablets is the latest proof that all Internet-connected computing devices must always be protected from malware. If your phone doesn’t work, you have lost a camera, and if your tablet doesn’t work, you have lost a valuable writing and reading platform. Zdnet wants you email address, but you get a free ebook download.

How to Write a History of Writing Software (The Atlantic)

First, a mechanical typewriter was invented to help writers write, and a century later, computers were equipped with word processing software. Science fiction writers were among the first to adopt modern technology because they realized it made them more productive. Fascinating stories on the history of writing.

Auroras Make Weird Noises, and Now We Know Why (National Geographic)

Many people who have seen a strong display of the Northern Lights claim that the lights made sounds. So far, science hasn’t been sure if that is really the case, but now a group of Finnish researchers believe they have discovered that the sounds are real and what causes them. Once you have read about the sounds, here is a guide to finding, viewing and photographing the Northern Lights.

National Geographic travel photography contest winners unveiled (BBC)

An image of a horseman in Inner Mongolia wins first place in this year’s National Geographic travel photography contest. View the amazing winning photos – our favorite: the Chinese school dormitory. More travel photography from Klaava Media here.

Ebook news digest: ereader reviews, drone photography for travelers, writing tips from an author, imprint explained

2016-06-22

Ebook news digest June 22th, 2016

apple ipad pro 9.7 smart keyboard
Why are there so many new publishing imprints? (The Guardian)

* So what is an imprint, and why are there suddenly so many more of them? The simple answer is that they are subdivisions of bigger publishers. Sometimes, they come about through takeovers and sometimes they are startups.

10 Travel Photography Tips (Julia Trotti)

* Excellent, proven tips. The only point we encourage travelers to reconsider is how many cameras to take along – with a high-end smartphone you can take excellent photos (and videos), and a waterproof camera is a practical choice in some destinations.

Ebook Readers: The 5 Best Models You Can Buy (Gear & Style CheatSheet)

* Yes, the Amazon Kindle is a very good ereader, but Kobo and Onyx models are good choices as well.

‘I write first thing, when I can suspend disbelief in the act of making things up’ (Will Self)

* It is valuable for a writer to learn from other writers. Will Self makes the point of writing a specific amount of text (a Conrad) in the morning before he does anything else. It works for some authors, whereas others may prefer to do other things in the morning and plan what to write in the afternoon.

High times: the rise of drone photography (The Guardian)

* Photos and video clips shot from drones are one of the fastest growing types of images on Instagram. A new profession: drone operators who travel to shoot images for brands.

Non-fiction ebooks for your smartphone, tablet, ereader or PC: download here.

Checklist for writers: ten things to do when you are serious about writing a book

2015-11-15

Many writers believe that they have to write a complete manuscript before contacting publishers. That’s usually the case with fiction books, but a non-fiction book publishing process typically starts from an overall concept and book proposal.
eyeglasses on computer keyboard
Here is a ten step checklist for preparing yourself to writing a non-fiction book.

1. Devise a concept for your book.
This is the most important step that defines whether you should sit down and start writing or continue crystallizing your concept (or think of a whole new topic). If you can establish a credible and appealing concept for your book that also other people love, proceed. If you can’t formulate a brief description what the book is about and why it is valuable, you have to rethink your concept.
In some cases, publishers may have a concept and the table of contents ready for your book – if your book idea happens to fall into a series they are publishing. For example, Klaava Travel Guide is a series for travel writers.

2. What new information or new angle your book provides to readers?
It is highly likely that your idea for a book is not unique, but books already have been published about the same topic. Does your book bring anything new on the table, or does it approach the problem from a fresh angle that talks to readers in a new way? Above all, who are the readers of your book?

3. Identify three or five books that are similar to your idea.
In most cases, it is beneficial for your book that other books have already been published about similar topics you are thinking about. It proves there is a market for your book. Analyze the competing books and think what you can do better or do in a different, more interesting way.

4. Write an outline and table of contents for your book.
Table of contents and a brief outline are hugely important because they are the first documents you may present to potential publishers. This is the minimum publishers want to see if you approach them with your idea (often, they want more, but this is enough for many publishers to tell if they are interested, or don’t want to hear about you anymore).
Check out tips for creating a table of contents in this article.

5. Write a few sample chapters.
Write one, two or even three chapters – it doesn’t matter if they are from the beginning or from the end of your planned book. Writing actual chapters proves two things:

First, if you haven’t written a book before, you get a feel how it goes. It is important to think and develop your personal working process right from the start: how and when you do your research, when do you work, for how long, how you edit?

Second, publishers usually want to see sample chapters because it shows them what to expect from you.

6. Put together a proposal for your book.
Your book proposal must specify the following, at least:
– The book concept and outline
– The market for the book
– Competing titles
– Who are you and why you are the perfect person to write the book
– Table of contents
– Sample chapter(s)
– Your possibilities to market the book

7. Prepare to market the book yourself.
Usually, it is the publisher’s job to market the book, but they need and want the author to help. In many cases, especially in non-fiction books, the author is the best marketing tool for the product. Do you have a blog, what is your social media following, who do know among the potential audience of your book, do you have media contacts, can you tap on networks that relate to the book?

8. Not everyone needs a literary agent.
In some countries, publishers expect writers to have agents and won’t touch book proposals if they haven’t been evaluated by agents. In most countries, however, publishers receive and evaluate book proposals submitted by authors.

For instance, Klaava Media reviews non-fiction book proposals (and especially travel guidebook proposals) sent by writers themselves.

If you can get an agent, the benefit is that you get access to publishers who will listen to you agent. The agent also helps you with contract issues. Of course, you’ll have to pay the agent. Usually, it is a percentage of the income you get from the book.

9. Prepare yourself for rejections and waiting.
Do your research when you look for a publisher. If the publisher says that they only publish textbooks, don’t submit your culture-guide proposal there. Try to identify a publisher that covers the book genre and audience you are after.
Still, rejections are inevitable, and waiting for answers. The old school rule in publishing used to be that you should submit your proposal to one publisher at a time. Since some publishers don’t respond at all and it may take months from some publishers to respond, we don’t recommend following the old school rule anymore.

10. Writing a book is unlikely to make you rich.
Movies, music, and books are hit businesses. Only few products turn out to be hits that generate a lot of money for authors and other copyright owners. The rest of the products belong to the Long Tail category where products slowly sell a number of copies over time. Fortunately, ebooks – and digital media in general – has made the Long Tail possible, because a published ebook can be made available across the world for as long as you like.

Mack Collier’s article 10 Things You Need to Know to Get Published was the inspiration for this article.

Top Ten Writing Tips for Nonfiction Authors from a Fiction Author

2015-02-18

Writing is craft that some writers learn in their daily work and others learn by taking courses. You might think that nonfiction and fiction writing require very different skills, but it is surprising how many bestselling authors write both types of books. Some have started writing because they were journalists, others because they had to draft educational material for their classes.

mikael niemi, author, book signing at a book show
Swedish author Mikael Niemi signing books at a book fair.

The author of Hobbits and The Lord of the Rings, J.R.R. Tolkien knows what he is talking about when he offers his advice for writers. Even though he wrote fiction on his spare time at home, he wrote nonfiction for his daily work.

Here is Tolkien’s top 10 writing tips infographics from Essaymama.

tolkien, tips for writers

Tolkien’s top 10 tips:
1. Vanity is useless. Your book is important for you, but be realistic how important it is to the rest of the world.
2. Keep a stiff upper lip. (Find time to write no matter what).
3. Listen to critics. Critics – Yes, Trolls – No.
4. Let your interests drive your writing. [this is very true for nonfiction as well – a book written with both passion and facts communicates with readers]
5. Poetry as a road to prose.
6. Happy accidents. Tolkien carefully planned the books but gave a chance to new ideas as well.
7. Dreams give us inspiration.
8. Real people make great characters.
9. You may be the next best selling author.
10. Books you write may seem trite.